News and Useful Links

Recycling Centres switch to winter hours

Full details about recycling are on the Household Recycling website

Climate Change & Air Quality Strategy for Buckinghamshire

Residents Survey at:  https://yourvoicebucks.citizenspace.com/environment/ccaq-public-survey-2020/

Buckinghamshire Council

Your council is changing

The new Buckinghamshire Council replaced all five of the district and county councils in Buckinghamshire on 1 April 2020. 

Wendover Community Board

What does the new council mean for me?

  • The same services, better together. For most people there will be no change to the day-to-day services you use. This includes bin collections, looking after our elderly and young people, libraries and parking. The focus for the future will be on improving these services as a new council together.
  • One council. Getting in touch with the council will be simpler because you’ll only need to contact one council for all the services currently provided by the county and district councils.
  • Face-to-face advice, support and information from your council through a network of 17 local Council Access Points based at the heart of your local community – in current council offices and libraries across the county. The five council offices in Aylesbury (Walton Street and The Gateway), High Wycombe, Amersham and Denham will be ‘access plus’ points, geared up to handle more complex enquiries.
  • Stronger links with local communities. Buckinghamshire Council councillors will work closely with local people and community organisations to understand and respond to the key issues affecting their local area through 16 Community Boards.

Who will be my local councillor on the new council?

There will be 147 councillors elected to Buckinghamshire Council. Elections for the new council will take place on 7 May 2020. Until these newly elected councillors take up their posts, your current elected members from the five existing councils will continue to serve your communities. ELECTIONS POSTPONED UNTIL MAY 2021

How can I find out more?

For regular news and updates, follow @BucksCouncil on Twitter and Facebook or find out more at Buckinghamshire Council’s website.

Other useful links:

Environmental Health issues: https://www.buckinghamshire.gov.uk/environment/

Highways are the remit of Bucks County Council which deals with potholes, road signage etc: https://fixmystreet.buckscc.gov.uk/

Rights of Way, footpath issues: https://www.buckinghamshire.gov.uk/environment/public-rights-way/

The Mike & Claire Griffin Charitable Trust: https://www.griffintrust.org/ – supporting good causes in Bierton & Hulcott.

Lambing season:

Vets are asking dog owners to keep their dogs on leads when walking near sheep as the annual lambing season gets underway. Ewes are particularly vulnerable at this time of year, as they prepare to give birth, and sheep worrying can have tragic consequences.

It is good practice for owners to keep dogs on leads at all times when walking near livestock but it is particularly important during the spring. Vets have seen a rise in the numbers of attacks, the results of which may often lead to lambs being lost and sheep being killed and injured.

British Veterinary Association (BVA) President and vet Robin Hargreaves said, “Even dogs who are usually calm and good natured can become very excitable and difficult to control when faced with livestock. Tragically this can lead to chasing, attacks and fatalities for sheep and other animals.

“Over the coming months ewes in the field are likely to be heavily pregnant or to have recently given birth. Chasing and worrying can have severe consequences at this time, leading to serious injuries, early labour and fatalities.

“Later in the season the arrival of lambs brings fresh temptation as their energy and activity can be irresistible to dogs. We ask that owners in rural areas keep their dogs on leads when walking near livestock. They should also consider taking alternative routes during the lambing season to avoid causing distress.”

Fiona Lovatt, President of the Sheep Veterinary Society, has worked with sheep farmers in County Durham and across the country. She said, “The results of these attacks are very distressing for the sheep, the farmer and for the vet. I’ve treated sheep which have been practically shredded by dogs and you often have no choice but to put them down. At this time of year a dog attack can have drastic effects even for the ewes who are not injured, as the stress may cause them to abort.”

Lovatt continued, “I think most owners are well meaning but if your dog is off the lead you may not even be aware of the chasing or attack. It’s important to know where your dog is at all times as they can cause a lot of damage in a short time.”